Twitter URLs redirect to x.com as Musk gets closer to killing the Twitter name


An app icon and logo for Elon Musk's X service.

Getty Images | Kirill Kudryavtsev

Twitter.com links are now redirecting to the x.com domain as Elon Musk gets closer to wiping out the Twitter brand name over a year and half after buying the company.

“All core systems are now on X.com,” Musk wrote in an X post today. X also displayed a message to users that said, “We are letting you know that we are changing our URL, but your privacy and data protection settings remain the same.”

Musk bought Twitter in October 2022 and turned it into X Corp. in April 2023, but the social network continued to use Twitter.com as its primary domain for more than another year. X.com links redirected to Twitter.com during that time.

There were still remnants of Twitter after today’s change. This morning, I noticed a support link took me to a help.twitter.com page. The link subsequently redirected to a help.x.com page after I sent a message to X’s public relations email, though the timing could be coincidence. After sending that message to press@x.com, I got the standard auto-reply from press+noreply@twitter.com, just as I have in the past.

You might still encounter Twitter links that don’t redirect to x.com, depending on which browser you use. The Verge said it is “seeing a mix of results depending upon browser choice and whether you’re logged in or not.”

I had no trouble accessing x.com on desktop browsers today. But in Safari on iPhone, I received error messages when trying to access either twitter.com or x.com without first logging in. I eventually succeeded in logging in and was able to view content, but I remained at twitter.com in the iPhone browser instead of being redirected to x.com.

This will presumably be sorted out, but the awkward Twitter-to-X transition has previously been accompanied by technical problems. In early April, Musk’s service started automatically changing “twitter.com” to “x.com” in links posted by users in the iOS app. But the automatic text replacement initially applied to any URL ending in “twitter.com” even if it wasn’t actually a twitter.com link, which meant that phishers could have taken advantage by registering misleading domain names.





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